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CCI Research Presentations and Publications

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2010
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Believing the blogs of war: How blog users compare on credibility and characteristics in 2003 and 2007?. Media, War and Conflict. 3(3), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Choosing is believing? How Web gratifications and reliance affect Internet credibility among politically interested users.. Atlantic Journal of Communication. 18(1), 
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Kim D.. (2010).  Creating a Web of trust and change: Testing the Gamson hypothesis on politically interested Internet users. Atlantic Journal of Communication. 18(5), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Putting out fire with gasoline: Gamson hypothesis, political information and political activity.. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference,.
Johnson, T. J., Bichard S. L., Zhang W., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Shut up and listen: The influence of selective exposure to blogs and political websites on political tolerance. Internet issues: Blogging, the digital divide and digital libraries.
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Meader A.. (2010).  Snooze, ruse, views, news? Online political information, credibility and media substitution.. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Kim, D.., Johnson T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Something ventured, something gained: Examining the moderating impact of blogs on political activity.. Web Journal of Mass Communication Research. 24,
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Still cruising and believing? An analysis of online credibility over three presidential campaigns.. American Behavioral Scientist. 54(1), 
2013
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Meader A.. (2013).  Accept no substitutes! Well, maybe some: Online political information, credibility and media substitution. International Symposium for Online Journalism (ISOJ). 3(2), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2013).  Across the great divide: How partisanship and the hostile media phenomenon influence time spent with media. Paper presented at the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  The dark side of the boon? Credibility, selective exposure and the proliferation of online sources of political information. Computers in Human Behavior. 29(5), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  Putting out fire with gasoline: Gamson hypothesis, political information and political activity. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 57(4), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2013).  Restoring sanity through comic relief: Parody television viewers and political outlook. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Washington, DC. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  Some like it lots: The influence of interactivity and reliance on credibility. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Washington, DC. .
2014
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  Credibility of social network sites for political information. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 19(4), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  I only have eyes for YouTube: Motives for political use. Paper presentated at the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2014).  Reasons to believe: Comparing the influence of reliance and gratifications on credibility of social networks. Paper presented at the World Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Nice, France..
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  The shot heard around the World Wide Web: Who heard what where about Osama bin Laden’s death. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication. 19(3), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  Strengthening the core: Examining interactivity, credibility, and reliance as measures of media use. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Montreal, Canada .

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