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CCI Research Presentations and Publications

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Conference Paper
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (1999).  A Tangled Web: The Internet's Influence on Political Attitudes. National Communication Association annual conference.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2012).  Those with the most social media friends win: Examining how reliance on four social media measures influences political attitudes and behaviors. Paper presented at the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (1997).  Trusting the Media and 'Joe from Dubuque': Comparing Internet and Traditional Sources on Media Credibility Measures. Communication Technology and Policy Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual convention ..
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (1999).  Using is Believing: The Influence of Reliance on Credibility of Online Political Information. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2003).  Wag the Blog: How Reliance on Traditional Media and the Internet Influence Perceptions of Weblogs Among Blog Users. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual convention.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2001).  A Web for All Reasons: Uses and Gratifications of Internet Resources for Political Information. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2003).  The World Wide Web of Sports: A Path Model Examining How Online Gratifications and Reliance Predict Credibility of Online Sports Information. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference.
Journal Article
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Meader A.. (2013).  Accept no substitutes! Well, maybe some: Online political information, credibility and media substitution. International Symposium for Online Journalism (ISOJ). 3(2), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2003).  Around the World Wide Web in 80 Ways: How Motives for Going Online are Linked to Internet Activities Among Politically Interested Internet Users. Social Science Computer Review. 21, 304-325.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Believing the blogs of war: How blog users compare on credibility and characteristics in 2003 and 2007?. Media, War and Conflict. 3(3), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2003).  Boost or Bust for Democracy: How the Internet Influences Political Attitudes and Behaviors. Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics. 8, 9-34.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Choosing is believing? How Web gratifications and reliance affect Internet credibility among politically interested users.. Atlantic Journal of Communication. 18(1), 
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Kim D.. (2010).  Creating a Web of trust and change: Testing the Gamson hypothesis on politically interested Internet users. Atlantic Journal of Communication. 18(5), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  Credibility of social network sites for political information. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 19(4), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (1998).  Cruising is Believing?: Comparing Internet and Traditional Sources on Media Credibility Measures. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 75, 325-340.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  The dark side of the boon? Credibility, selective exposure and the proliferation of online sources of political information. Computers in Human Behavior. 29(5), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2004).  For Whom the Web Toils: How Internet Experience Predicts Web Reliance and Credibility. Atlantic Journal of Communication. 12, 19-45.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2003).  From Here to Obscurity: The Internet and Media Substitution Theory. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 54, 260-273.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2011).  Hot diggity blog: A cluster analysis examining motivations and other factors for why people judge different types of blogs as credible. Mass Communication & Society. 14(2), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2015).  I only have eyes for YouTube: Motives for political use. Journal of Social Media Studies. 1(2), 91-104.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2002).  Online and In the Know: Uses and Gratifications of the Web for Political Information. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media. 46, 54-71.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  Putting out fire with gasoline: Gamson hypothesis, political information and political activity. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 57(4), 
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2015).  Reasons to believe: Comparing the influence of reliance and gratifications on credibility of social networks. Computers in Human Behavior. 50, 544-555.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  The shot heard around the World Wide Web: Who heard what where about Osama bin Laden’s death. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication. 19(3), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2015).  Site effects: How reliance on social media influences confidence in the government and news media. Social Science Computer Review. 33(2), 127-144.
Kim, D.., Johnson T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Something ventured, something gained: Examining the moderating impact of blogs on political activity.. Web Journal of Mass Communication Research. 24,
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Still cruising and believing? An analysis of online credibility over three presidential campaigns.. American Behavioral Scientist. 54(1), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (1999).  Taming the Cyber Frontier: Techniques for Improving Online Surveys. Social Science Computer Review. 17, 323-337.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2000).  Using is Believing: The Influence of Reliance on the Credibility of Online Political Information Among Politically Interested Internet Users. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 77, 865- 879.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2004).  Wag the Blog: How Reliance on Traditional Media and the Internet Influence Perceptions of Credibility of Weblogs among Blog Users. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. 81, 622-642.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2004).  A Web for All Reasons: Uses and Gratifications of Internet Resources for Political Information. Telematics and Informatics. 21, 197-223.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2002).  Webelievabilty: A Path Model Examining How Convenience and Reliance on the Web Predict Online Credibility. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 79, 619-642.

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