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CCI Research Presentations and Publications

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Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Putting out fire with gasoline: Gamson hypothesis, political information and political activity.. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference,.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  Putting out fire with gasoline: Gamson hypothesis, political information and political activity. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 57(4), 
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Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2014).  Reasons to believe: Comparing the influence of reliance and gratifications on credibility of social networks. Paper presented at the World Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Nice, France..
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2015).  Reasons to believe: Comparing the influence of reliance and gratifications on credibility of social networks. Computers in Human Behavior. 50, 544-555.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2013).  Restoring sanity through comic relief: Parody television viewers and political outlook. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Washington, DC. .
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Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2011).  The shot heard around the World Wide Web: Who heard what where about Osama bin Laden’s death. Paper presented at the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  The shot heard around the World Wide Web: Who heard what where about Osama bin Laden’s death. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication. 19(3), 
Johnson, T. J., Bichard S. L., Zhang W., & Kaye B. K. (2008).  Shut up and listen: The influence of selective exposure to blogs and political websites on political tolerance.. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research Annual Convention.
Johnson, T. J., Bichard S. L., Zhang W., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Shut up and listen: The influence of selective exposure to blogs and political websites on political tolerance. Internet issues: Blogging, the digital divide and digital libraries.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2015).  Site effects: How reliance on social media influences confidence in the government and news media. Social Science Computer Review. 33(2), 127-144.
Johnson, T. J., Kaye B. K., & Meader A.. (2010).  Snooze, ruse, views, news? Online political information, credibility and media substitution.. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2013).  Some like it lots: The influence of interactivity and reliance on credibility. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Washington, DC. .
Kim, D.., Johnson T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Something ventured, something gained: Examining the moderating impact of blogs on political activity.. Web Journal of Mass Communication Research. 24,
Kim, D., Johnson T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2006).  Something Ventured, Something Gained: Moderating Impact of Blogs on Political Activity. AEJMC Annual Conference.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2007).  Still Cruising and Believing? An Analysis of Online Credibility over Three Presidential Campaigns.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2010).  Still cruising and believing? An analysis of online credibility over three presidential campaigns.. American Behavioral Scientist. 54(1), 
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2014).  Strengthening the core: Examining interactivity, credibility, and reliance as measures of media use. Paper presented at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference, Montreal, Canada .
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Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (1999).  Taming the Cyber Frontier: Techniques for Improving Online Surveys. Social Science Computer Review. 17, 323-337.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (1997).  Taming the Cyber Frontier: Techniques for Improving Online Surveys. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual convention.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (1999).  A Tangled Web: The Internet's Influence on Political Attitudes. National Communication Association annual conference.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2012).  Those with the most social media friends win: Examining how reliance on four social media measures influences political attitudes and behaviors. Paper presented at the Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual conference, Chicago, IL. .
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (1997).  Trusting the Media and 'Joe from Dubuque': Comparing Internet and Traditional Sources on Media Credibility Measures. Communication Technology and Policy Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual convention ..
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Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2004).  Wag the Blog: How Reliance on Traditional Media and the Internet Influence Perceptions of Credibility of Weblogs among Blog Users. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. 81, 622-642.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2003).  Wag the Blog: How Reliance on Traditional Media and the Internet Influence Perceptions of Weblogs Among Blog Users. Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research annual convention.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2004).  A Web for All Reasons: Uses and Gratifications of Internet Resources for Political Information. Telematics and Informatics. 21, 197-223.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2001).  A Web for All Reasons: Uses and Gratifications of Internet Resources for Political Information. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2002).  Webelievabilty: A Path Model Examining How Convenience and Reliance on the Web Predict Online Credibility. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 79, 619-642.
Kaye, B. K., & Johnson T. J. (2004).  Weblogs as a Source of Information about the War on Iraq. (Berenger, R. D., Ed.).Global Media Go To War. 293-303.
Johnson, T. J., & Kaye B. K. (2003).  The World Wide Web of Sports: A Path Model Examining How Online Gratifications and Reliance Predict Credibility of Online Sports Information. Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication annual conference.

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